05
Jun
10

A brief history of audio-visual resonance

An understanding of quantum and newtonian physics will teach you that you can use the same set of equations to predict the behavior of two superficially independent physical phenomenon:  the resonant nature of sound and of quantum mechanical entities. Using combinations of sine/cosine functions (Fourier series) you can generate a reliable means of modelling an incredible array of natural experience. But for a long time the technology lagged behind the theory, and concrete examples were limited to the vibrations of, say, strings. It wasn’t until the second half of the 19th century that we had means for rigorous but feasible demonstrations of more complex behavior, such as the Ruben’s Tube or “cymatics” – which principally consists visual demonstrations of vibrational modes. A particularly compelling (and relatively early) example follows,

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sY6z2hLgYuY

Here’s a TED lecture on cymatics as well.

Advertisements

0 Responses to “A brief history of audio-visual resonance”



  1. Leave a Comment

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


June 2010
M T W T F S S
« May   Jul »
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
282930  

%d bloggers like this: