21
Mar
10

names part 2 : polynomial approximation

By performing a simple alphanumeric conversion (i.e. a = 1, b = 2 etc) you can fit polynomials to words, and therefore come up with a continuous interpolation of them, for example producing a letter for the 3/2th place in the word “GHOST” (turns out it’s F) or any other place along the line, although what the meaning of these non-integer ordered letters is I don’t understand.In the plot above, you can see the polynomials for GHOST and ISLAND, illustrating how they take the respective alphanumeric values at each integer. Rounding to the nearest integer, the letter at each quarter step (i.e.  at 1, 1.25, 1.5, etc instead of at only 1, 2, 3 etc) gives the following strings:

GFFGHJLMOPRRSST IKNQSSRPLHDBABEINRTPD

As expected, every fourth letter is the that of the original word. This method only covers a single case of the 26 letters in the English alphabet. If you continue to values beyond the place of the last letter (or before the first) you get numbers beyond 26 (or below 0.)

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